Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Review: The Last Time I Saw You by Liv Constantine


Kerry Hammond is here to give us her review of the second book by the writing duo known as Liv Constantine.

The Last Time I Saw You by Liv Constantine was released on May 7, in Hardcover, by Harper. Liv Constantine is the pen name chosen by sisters Lynne and Valerie Constantine and this is the second book they’ve published using their combined names. The first, The Last Mrs. Parrish, was featured in a Drinks with Reads segment on Mystery Playground. You can read that post HERE.

The Last Time I Saw You centers around an affluent community in Maryland. Kate English is a wealthy heart surgeon whose mother, Lily, has been brutally murdered. The police are baffled and Kate is just trying to keep it together. She is surrounded by friends and family, including her father and her husband, Simon. But it’s Blaire Barrington’s appearance at Lily’s funeral that has Kate reeling. She and Blaire used to be the best of friends. They were inseparable throughout high school and into college; Lily even welcomed Blaire into the family and treated her like a second daughter.

Blaire and Kate had a falling out when Blaire disapproved of Kate’s marriage to Simon. Now, all these years later, after the loss of her mother, Kate welcomes Blaire back into her life. The women begin to recreate the bond they once had, something Simon is not at all pleased with. Blaire decides to help Kate figure out who killed Lily and why, but the closer they get to the truth, the more fragile Kate’s nerves become. When the killer begins to stalk her, she suspects everyone around her, finding it hard to decide who to trust.

I read The Last Mrs. Parrish and enjoyed it, so I was excited to see that the authors had another book in the works. I would categorize The Last Time I Saw You as a domestic thriller, a genre that has been quite popular of late. Kate’s grieving and history of anxiety make her an unreliable narrator, but Constantine manages to tell the story without the cliched alcohol and drug addiction that is so often a part of these stories. It was refreshing to see that  these elements don’t need to be present to make up an enjoyable read.

I was surprised to find out that the book was written by two authors. The sisters must be very in tune with each other’s writing because it is seamlessly written, without any awkward changes in voice. A great summer read.

This book was provided to Mystery Playground by the publisher. The review was fair and completely independent.


You can always find Mystery Playground on Twitter @mysteryplaygrnd and on Facebook. You can also follow the blog by clicking the link on the upper right-hand corner of this webpage. 


Tuesday, June 11, 2019

Review: The Body in the Wake by Katherine Hall Page


Kerry Hammond is here to tell us about the latest book in the Faith Fairchild mystery series by Katherine Hall Page.

Katherine Hall Page, author of the long-running Faith Fairchild mystery series, has released her 25th book in that series. The Body in the Wake was published on May 7, in Hardcover, by William Morrow. Any author that can keep a series fresh for 25 books amazes me, yet Page manages to do just that.

In The Body in the Wake, Faith and her friend Sophie are taking a swim in the pond when they come across the dead body of an unknown man. The police are baffled by the man’s death as well as the strange tattoo he has on his arm. Faith, although busy helping plan her friend Pix’s daughter’s wedding, finds time to do a little sleuthing with Sophie to find out what the man was doing in town and why he was killed.

Followers of the series have seen a lot happen in Faiths world. Kids have grown, and there have been many marriages, funerals, and babies. These books are feel good reads where catching up with the characters is just as important as the plot, and this plot hits close to home by dealing with the opioid crisis. Page does a great job weaving a real-life issue into a fictional murder mystery; the details are all too realistic.

Life at Faith’s summer cottage in Maine is always interesting and I think the setting makes the book a great summer beach read. Each installment reads well as a standalone and the author manages to give enough backstory for those who jump in mid-series. So reading them out of order isn’t an issue.

A great added bonus: the books have a large culinary component and the author includes recipes in the back that appear in the story.

This book was provided to Mystery Playground by the publisher. The review was fair and completely independent.

You can always find Mystery Playground on Twitter @mysteryplaygrnd and on Facebook. You can also follow the blog by clicking the link on the upper right-hand corner of this webpage.


Friday, June 7, 2019

Drinks with Reads—FLAMINGO BINGO




Our guest today on Drinks with Reads is Terrie Farley Moran. Terrie is the recipient of both the Agatha and the Derringer awards, Terrie Farley Moran is the author of the beachside Read 'Em and Eat cozy mystery series; co-author of Laura Childs’ New Orleans scrapbooking mystery series; and has published numerous short stories in Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine and numerous anthologies. You can also find Terrie on Facebook



“Flamingo Bingo” featured in the May/June issue of Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, tells us what danger can lurk when a daughter decides to make a birthday visit to her mother who lives in a trendy Florida retirement community, complete with swimming, bike riding, and even a game called Pickleball. There are always events and parties in the community clubhouse, and naturally, alcohol is often served. Since The Sunshine State is famous for lush oranges, highballs and cocktails that include oranges are extremely popular.
There is a lot of confusion about exactly when the Harvey Wallbanger was invented and whether or not it was named after a surfer named Tom Harvey, who may or may not have started running into walls after he’d drunk a few of them.
Still, no matter the origin of the drink, the vanilla/anise taste of the yellow Galliano mixes sweetly with vodka and orange juice, turning an ordinary Screwdriver into a refreshing patio drink on a Florida summer evening.
Harvey Wallbanger
Ingredients1 1/2 oz Vodka, 3 oz  Fresh orange juice, 1/2 oz  Galliano

PreparationStir the vodka and orange juice with ice in the glass, then float the Galliano on top. 

ServedOn the rocks; poured over ice

Garnish: with an orange slice if preferred

Don’t wait until you visit Florida to try a Wallbanger. They are delicious whenever you may be. And if you are not familiar with Galliano, every liquor store carries it. Look for a pretty yellow liquid in a clear tall bottle. 







Thursday, June 6, 2019

Review: Murder at Morrington Hall by Clara McKenna


Today we're reviewing a new historical mystery set in Edwardian England.

Murder at Morrington Hall by Clara McKenna was released in Hardcover on May 28 by Kensington. It is the author’s first novel and the first book in the new Stella and Lyndy mystery series. The historical series takes place in Edwardian era England and mixes horse racing and murder. I’m a big fan of historical mysteries and I am always looking for new series to try.

The year is 1905 and American heiress Stella Kendrick leaves her home in Kentucky with her father to travel to England. She thinks she’s helping deliver a few racehorses to a wealthy British family. What she doesn’t know is that her father has promised her hand in marriage to Viscount Lyndhurst, or Lyndy as he prefers to be called. Stella is mortified that she’s being married off, but she can’t help her attraction to the young Viscount. Lyndy is initially hesitant, but finds himself charmed at the American’s spunk and love of horses.

The young courtship is cut short when the Reverend Bullmore, who is supposed to perform the ceremony, is found murdered at Morrington Hall. Stella and Lyndy’s marriage is put on the back burner as the two get wrapped up in solving the murder.

I think this is going to be a great new series. It’s a bit reminiscent of Downton Abbey, if Downton had a murdered vicar in the library. I think it’s a great setup—the American heiress matched up with British high society. Stella is a free spirit and a likeable character. Lyndy starts off a bit arrogant, but manages to grow on you. I look forward to the next book in the series.

This book was provided to Mystery Playground by the publisher. The review was fair and completely independent.

You can always find Mystery Playground on Twitter @mysteryplaygrnd and on Facebook. You can also follow the blog by clicking the link on the upper right-hand corner of this webpage. 


Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Review: Westside by W.M. Akers


Kerry Hammond is here today to review a debut author's first novel.

Westside by W. M. Akers was released on May 7, in Hardcover, by Harper Voyager. It is the author’s first novel and I was intrigued by the description of how it mixed fantasy with mystery. I don’t normally read fantasy or sci-fi, but occasionally like to step out of my comfort zone and try something new. This was definitely different and I really found myself enjoying the story.

The book is set in Manhattan in the year 1921, but it’s not the 1921 of history books. It’s a dystopian version of the past, where Manhattan is split between the Westside and the Eastside; between affluence and corruption; and maybe even good versus evil. The Westside is full of corruption, bootleg liquor and turf wars. It’s a dangerous place where people and things go missing. It’s where Gilda Carr lives.

The Westside is all Gilda has ever known. She lost both her parents, but it’s her father’s disappearance that has most recently haunted her. A policeman turned private investigator, he was obsessed with figuring out what evil was responsible for the vanishing population, totaling in the hundreds each year. Gilda solves mysteries, but unlike her father, she focuses on tiny mysteries. Her most recent case is finding a missing glove for Mrs. Copeland, but her simple search for the glove leads Gilda to something far bigger than she imagined.

Akers has quite an imagination and a wry sense of storytelling. I fell for Gilda immediately and got completely wrapped up in the narrative. It really is a mystery of sorts, but with a twist ending you won’t expect. I thoroughly enjoyed the book and I can see Gilda appearing in another installment. I’m glad I stepped out of my comfort zone to try it.

This book was provided to Mystery Playground by the publisher. The review was fair and completely independent.

You can always find Mystery Playground on Twitter @mysteryplaygrnd and on Facebook. You can also follow the blog by clicking the link on the upper right-hand corner of this webpage. 


Tuesday, June 4, 2019

Review: The Sentence is Death by Anthony Horowitz




Kerry Hammond is a fan of everything Anthony Horowitz writes and she’s here today to tell us about his latest release.

Anthony Horowitz is the author of standalone mystery novels, a bestselling young adult series, books featuring James Bond and Sherlock Holmes, as well as hundreds of episodes for British shows such as Foyle’s War and Midsomer Murders. His most recent novel, The Sentence is Death, was released in Hardcover on May 28, by Harper. It’s the second book in a series where the author writes himself in as a character, working alongside private investigator Daniel Hawthorne.

In The Sentence is Death, Daniel Hawthorne once again seeks the assistance of writer Anthony Horowitz to chronicle his work as a private detective. He wanders onto the set of Foyle’s War where Horowitz is working and asks him to join him on a case. He is investigating the murder of divorce lawyer Richard Pryce. There are several people who might want to harm the lawyer, but one in particular threatened him in the exact way he was killed.

Hawthorne and Horowitz soon learn of another death that may be connected to their current investigation and the shared history of the two victims opens up an even bigger pool of suspects. Horowitz blunders his way into the investigation but doesn’t seem to be able to make any sense of the clues, all the while managing to irritate the police detective who is working the case.

The lines between fact and fiction are deliciously skewed as Horowitz writes himself into the plot of the book, even incorporating his work on the Foyle’s War set. He paints himself as an inferior Watson to Hawthorne’s Holmes, struggling to piece together the clues and solve the case alongside the ex-policeman. As before, he fails miserably and Hawthorne’s deductive reasoning outshines any contribution he may have had. It’s a clever premise for an author to write himself into the mystery and Horowitz manages to do it with ease. As with all of his novels, the story is cleverly plotted so that this reader was also two steps behind Hawthorne and the big reveal.

This book was provided to Mystery Playground by the publisher. The review was fair and completely independent.

You can always find Mystery Playground on Twitter @mysteryplaygrnd and on Facebook. You can also follow the blog by clicking the link on the upper right-hand corner of this webpage.